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Different Factors That Affect Your Tires

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For anyone who’s struck with wanderlust, there’s nothing better than traveling on the open road. However, you don’t want to end up stranded because something with your car went awry. In particular, your tires are one part of your car that endures the most stress over the course of your journey. To help you keep on top of your tires’ condition, we discuss some different factors that affect your tires.

Tire Pressure

The most basic contributing factor is the pressure of your tires. It’s detrimental for your tires to be underinflated or overinflated. Under-pressure tires become deformed more easily and cause your vehicle to work harder to maintain the same speeds. This extra effort to drive on under-inflated tires creates a significant amount of heat that warps and melts the rubber.

Over-inflated tires are more rigid, which reduces their contact area with the road. This accelerates the wear and tear of the tire, as it’s less capable of enduring impacts and is much more likely to pop altogether.

Load Capacity

Many car owners overinflate their tires, believing this will increase the load capacity of their vehicle. This is not only false but creates extra problems while traveling. The more weight you place on your car, the more strain you put on your tires. Each tire has its own load capacity, and exceeding that capacity will greatly reduce its lifespan.

Road Conditions

Highway and city road conditions impact tires differently. While you may think highways are worse for tires because you’re moving faster for longer, city streets are actually far worse. Highways are typically better maintained, and the consistent speeds you travel on them are less stressful on tires. In contrast, city streets often have potholes that can damage wheel alignment or outright pop your tires. Also, constant braking in traffic creates friction that wears down tires.

Driving Habits

Of the different factors that affect your tires, your personal driving habits may be among the biggest threats to your tires. For instance, if you tend to slam on the brakes rather than easing to a stop, you create lots of friction that wears down your tires more. Other habits like sharp steering or speeding on bad roads can put a lot of intense, sudden strain on your tires, significantly reducing their lifespan. Keep this in mind when you travel to avoid tire issues that put your journey to a sudden halt.

For anyone who’s struck with wanderlust, there’s nothing better than traveling on the open road. However, you don’t want to end up stranded because something with your car went awry. In particular, your tires are one part of your car that endures the most stress over the course of your journey. To help you keep on top of your tires’ condition, we discuss some different factors that affect your tires.

Tire Pressure

The most basic contributing factor is the pressure of your tires. It’s detrimental for your tires to be underinflated or overinflated. Under-pressure tires become deformed more easily and cause your vehicle to work harder to maintain the same speeds. This extra effort to drive on under-inflated tires creates a significant amount of heat that warps and melts the rubber.

Over-inflated tires are more rigid, which reduces their contact area with the road. This accelerates the wear and tear of the tire, as it’s less capable of enduring impacts and is much more likely to pop altogether.

Load Capacity

Many car owners overinflate their tires, believing this will increase the load capacity of their vehicle. This is not only false but creates extra problems while traveling. The more weight you place on your car, the more strain you put on your tires. Each tire has its own load capacity, and exceeding that capacity will greatly reduce its lifespan.

Road Conditions

Highway and city road conditions impact tires differently. While you may think highways are worse for tires because you’re moving faster for longer, city streets are actually far worse. Highways are typically better maintained, and the consistent speeds you travel on them are less stressful on tires. In contrast, city streets often have potholes that can damage wheel alignment or outright pop your tires. Also, constant braking in traffic creates friction that wears down tires.

Driving Habits

Of the different factors that affect your tires, your personal driving habits may be among the biggest threats to your tires. For instance, if you tend to slam on the brakes rather than easing to a stop, you create lots of friction that wears down your tires more. Other habits like sharp steering or speeding on bad roads can put a lot of intense, sudden strain on your tires, significantly reducing their lifespan. Keep this in mind when you travel to avoid tire issues that put your journey to a sudden halt.

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Written by Logan Voss

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